PANEL DISCUSSIONS
 


Monday 20th June 2016 - 18:30-19:30 (Room: Spelbomskan)

PROGRESS REPORT: INTERNATIONAL DRILLING TO RECOVER AQUIFER SANDS (IDRAs): PLANNING THE NEXT ICDP PROPOSAL
A. van Geen (Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University, NY, USA)

Biogeochemical processes regulating solute concentrations including arsenic in groundwater are poorly understood despite growing reliance on this natural resource throughout the world. A key reason is that current scientific drilling capabilities do not provide geoscientists with pristine samples of groundwater, in contact with their host aquifer sands, that are suitable for state-of-the-art characterization and analysis. Groundwater and aquifer sands typically are collected separately and with little control over chemical alteration or microbial contamination during recovery. The goal of this project funded since 2013 by the US National Science Foundation (NSF) and the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program (ICDP) has been to develop a new coring tool that recovers uncompromised aquifer sediment simultaneously with groundwater by freezing the bottom of a core.

Two existing wire-line coring tools extensively deployed by DOSECC Exploration Services (http://dosecc.com/): the Hydraulic Piston Corer (HPC) and a concentric rotating barrel system, coined the Alien (ALN) have to date been modified to freeze sediment in situ with a stream of expanding liquid carbon dioxide. In December 2014, the freeze-shoe modified HPC recovered for the first time a core with a partially frozen plug of aquifer sand at the bottom, albeit from a shallow depth. In March 2016, the freeze-shoe modified ALN recovered a sediment core frozen at the bottom from a depth of 180 m. If additional testing planned for Fall 2016 proves to be successful, a new proposal to deploy these new coring tools in South and Southeast Asia for arsenic resarch will be submitted to ICDP in January 2017. The purpose of this open meeting is to provide an overview of the tool development and to solicit input for the next proposal, particularly concerning the choice of drilling sites. 



Tuesday 21st June 2016- 12:30-13:30  (Auditorium 1 (Gates A+B)

SCALING SAFE DRINKING WATER ACCESS – PAST, PRESENT AND WAY FORWARD FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT SOLUTIONS

Panelists:
Prosun Bhattacharya (KTH), A. van Geen (Eeartyh Institute, Columbia University), Hrachya Sarsgyan (Unicef Bangladesh), Kazi Matin Ahmed (Dhaka University), Mattias von Brömssen (Ramboll Sweden), Doris van Haalem (TU Delft), Jochen Bundschuh (USQ), Ashok Ghosh (AN College, Patna), Arslan Ahmed (KWR)

Although Bangladesh has made progress towards achieving its goal of access to improved water supply, significant challenges remain in terms of quality and sustainability of the water supply. About 65% of the population lack access to drinking water that is arsenic safe and free from microbial contamination. Naturally occurring arsenic is widely abundant in Bangladesh groundwater systems and today more than 40 million people are drinking water with arsenic concentrations exceeding WHOs guideline values for drinking water. 
This panel would discuss the drinking water safety challenges faced by the  implementing agencies and sector professionals towards water safety and water management framework with the objective of mitigating the negative impacts of water contamination on health. Because of the magnitude of the arsenic problem and the infrastructural situation, sustainable strategies to be scaled up should involve steps to develop capacity at local governmental institutions and to develop capacity of the private sector,  that contribute to 90% of the tubewell installations in the country, are top priorities.

Key questions that the panel will try to address include:
(1) Is there a broad consensus among health scientist around the number of annual deaths attributable to arsenic exposure in Bangladesh?
(2) Has process by which deep public wells have been allocated at the regional- to village-scale in Bangladesh maximized their impact?   
(3)  How many deep public wells should the government install and what procedure should be followed?
(4) How could government and the private sector complement each other more effectively in the provision of safe drinking water across the country?

 

SPECIAL SESSION

 

Monday 20th June 2016 - 14:00-15:15  (Seminar room Spelbomskan)

ARSENIC CONTAMINATION AND CHANGING ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITIONS 
In collaboration with the Bolin Centre for Climate Research

Participants: Jerker Jarsjö (SU, Bolin Center for Climate Research), Sergey Chalov (Lomonosov Moscow State University), Daniel Karthe (Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research UFZ) and Steffen Holzkämper (Stockholm University).
This session consists of a series of short talks. The topic is water-borne spreading of arsenic from sources zones (e.g., mining and industrial sources) to different environmental compartments (soil water, groundwater, rivers, and recipients including drinking water wells). A particular focus is how the processes and impacts are affected by on-going changes in environmental conditions, including climate change. The possibility of detecting such changes over longer periods of time through dendrochemistry is evaluated. Participants include Sergey Chalov (Lomonosov Moscow State University), Daniel Karthe (Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research UFZ) and Steffen Holzkämper (Stockholm University).